Workout Wednesday at 7PM: Circuit Training

Join the movement with us this week for Workout Wednesdays!

This week we will be hosting a free AMRAP (As Many Reps As Possible) Circuit Training session on ZOOM. Download the app for free on any web browser or mobile device and click the link here at 7 PM Wednesday to join the workout.

ZOOM ID: 626-748-173

For this week’s workout, you will need small dumbbells for arm exercises. All other exercises are weight-based and incorporate your body through movement to create resistance. If you do not own dumbbells, you can alternate with other household objects at this time such as water bottles or laundry detergent.

The coronavirus has changed daily life around the world in so many ways: the way we shop, the way we work, the way we socialize, and yes, the way we exercise. If you usually work out, or if you are craving more activity now that the globe is on lockdown, you might be wondering, where and how can do accomplish this?

Exercise is more important than ever during this pandemic, especially when it comes to reducing that funk so many of us are in right now. Physical activity improves mood and well-being and reduces stress and anxiety.

You can also use exercise as a way to organize your day. Our daily lives can be more stressful when we do not have a schedule, and exercise can be an anchor.

Do not feel pressure to turn your microphone or video options on, as this is all about your health and healing during this time. If you have a question during the workout, please feel free to speak up! Please listen to your body and alter any exercise as needed. If you need any personalized advice on how to change a position after the session, please contact me directly at info@partners-in-health.com.

Your personal fitness coach,

Alyssa

Update on COVID-19

With the evolution of the outbreak, our understanding of the transmission of COVID-19 virus continues to improve daily. Recent findings of the CDC suggest that this virus has the ability to transmit far easier than the flu, making it probably about three times as infectious as the flu.

Transmission of COVID-19

By definition from the WHO, a symptomatic COVID-19 case is a case who has developed signs and symptoms compatible with COVID-19 virus infection. Symptomatic transmission refers to transmission from a person while they are experiencing symptoms. COVID-19 is primarily transmitted from symptomatic people to others who are in close contact through respiratory droplets, by direct contact with infected people, or by contact with contaminated objects and surfaces.

One of the latest findings confirmed that up to 25% of individuals in the US that are infected remain asymptomatic. What does it mean to be asymptomatic? According to the WHO, an asymptomatic person is someone who is infected with COVID-19 and does not develop symptoms. Asymptomatic transmission refers to transmission of the virus from a person, who does not develop symptoms. Even though these individuals are asymptomatic, they do contribute to transmission.

The incubation period for COVID-19, which is the time between exposure to the virus (becoming infected) and symptom onset, is on average 5-6 days. However, incubation period can be up to 14 days. This period is also known as the “pre-symptomatic” period. Pre-symptomatic transmission refers to transmission of the virus from a person, who has not yet developed symptoms. Studies show that people can test positive for COVID-19 1-3 days before they develop symptoms. It is possible for people infected with COVID-19 to transmit the virus before any significant symptoms develop. This helps explain how rapidly the virus continues to spread across the country, because we have individuals who are transmitting the virus 48-72 hours before they become symptomatic.

New face mask recommendations?

Due to recent studies that strongly suggest the virus is possibly transmitted by simply speaking, the CDC recommends the community use of cloth masks as an additional public health measure people can take to prevent the spread of the virus to those around them, especially for pre-symptomatic and asymptomatic individuals. Cloth masks include the use of bandannas, scarves, and homemade masks (click here for suggestions on easy DIY masks at little to no cost). This does not include buying surgical masks or N95s, as this recommendation is not meant to take away availability of masks from health care providers on the front lines. It is important to keep in mind that is in addition to social distancing and practicing good hand-washing hygiene, and not a replacement.

As Dr. Anthony Fauci, the director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, stated, social distancing is a powerful weapon. With the social distancing guidelines extended until April 30th, we urge our patients to stay home. When you have to be in the public, distance yourself at least 6 feet away from people and wear your masks. As always, we will be here to keep you up to date with the evolving situation.

Introducing Workout Wednesdays – Tomorrow at 7PM!

The coronavirus has changed daily life around the world in so many ways: the way we shop, the way we work, the way we socialize, and yes, the way we exercise. If you usually work out, or if you are craving more activity now that the globe is on lockdown, you might be wondering, where and how can do accomplish this?

Exercise is more important than ever during this pandemic, especially when it comes to reducing that funk so many of us are in right now. Physical activity improves mood and well-being and reduces stress and anxiety.

You can also use exercise as a way to organize your day. Our daily lives can be more stressful when we do not have a schedule, and exercise can be an anchor.

Join the movement with us on our new Workout Wednesdays!

This week we will be hosting a free yoga session on ZOOM. Download the app for free on any web browser or mobile device and click the link here at 7 PM tomorrow to join the workout.

Do not feel pressure to turn your microphone or video options on, as this is all about your health and healing during this time. If you have a question during the workout, please feel free to speak up! Please listen to your body and alter any pose as needed. If you need any personalized advice on how to change a position after the session, please contact me directly at info@partners-in-health.com.

Your personal fitness coach,

Alyssa

Things to do at Home While in Quarantine

So you’re stuck at home and self-isolating during the coronavirus pandemic. What is there to do?

There are plenty of ways to pass the time — and many of them are free or cost-effective.

*Click links for direct access to each recommendation* 
  • PuzzlesNot only are jigsaw puzzles fun to do, but they are excellent for brain training too. Working a puzzle helps develop your abilities to sequence, reason, analyze, deduce, logical thought processes and problem solving skills. It’s a great way to engage with others, while engaging your brain!

  • Reading (create a virtual book club) – Reading is another great way to keep your brain active while at home. Numerous studies have shown the many ways reading benefits your brain, including mental stimulation, stress reduction, enhanced social skills, vocabulary expansion, memory improvement, improved brain connectivity and function, and better sleep. Thanks to technology, book clubs can be held virtually through multiple platforms, including threads, online groups, and video chat. Pick a book for you and your family or friends to read and discuss it for even further engagement. Click here for 6 books written by Austin authors.

  • Solitary Walks/Runs/Bike Rides (with dogs)  – It is important to stay physically active. Even with the Stay-at-Home order, you are still allowed to be outdoors for individual activity. A 30-minute walk outside has many benefits, including burning calories, strengthening your heart, lowering your blood sugar, easing joint pain, boosting your immune function and energy. It can also improve your mood and it may help clear your head and help you think creatively. Other exercises can also include resistance bands and dumbbells, or stretching to work on your flexibility.

  • Fostering animalsAustin Pets Alive really needs fosters right now for dogs and cats! If you are not currently looking to adopt a pet, you can still help by taking in an animal and help to care for them until they find a permanent home. There are many health benefits of interacting with pets. Pets can increase opportunities to exercise, get outside, and socialize (even at 6 feet apart). Regular walking or playing with pets can decrease blood pressure, cholesterol levels, and triglyceride levels. Pets can help manage loneliness and depression by giving us companionship. Teaching a dog or cat new tricks is also another great way to past the time.

It doesn’t stop there, there are so many other things you can do to keep yourself and your brain active during this time. Check out these options and challenge yourself!

  • Video Games  
  • Painting by Numbers
  • Blog or journal
  • Spring Clean and organize (Watch Marie Kondo‘s Tidying Tips on Netflix)
  • Streaming TV (You can watch with your friends online with Netflix’s new Netflix Party feature)
  • Yoga 
  • Meditation (HeadSpace App)
  • Create To-Do Lists
  • Cook new recipes
  • Learn an instrument
  • Create a Duolingo account and learn a new language
  • Board Games
  • Crosswords, Sudoku, Word Search or other games on your phone
  • Knit or Crochet
  • Create a fort inside your home – a great option for kids!
  • Learn Origami
  • Create a scavenger hunt – another great option for kids!
  • Pray or watch church online
  • Learn how to macrame
  • Catch up on sleep
  • Call your family and friends!

Taking care of yourself, your friends, and your family can help you cope with stress. Helping others cope with their stress can also make your community stronger.

Update on COVID-19

Stay Home – Work Safe Order Effective 11:59 PM on March 24, 2020

Mayor Adler issued a stay-at-home order for the city of Austin. This new order states people may leave their residences only to perform “Essential Activities”, to work in or obtain services from an “Essential Business” ,”Essential Government Service”, or in “Critical Infrastructure”, or to engage in “Essential Travel”  or “Minimum Basic Operations”. Please read through the order to understand which activities are considered essential and which are not. These are steps that promote social distancing to help prevent the spread of COVID-19.

Potential COVID-19 Treatments?

There are currently no FDA-approved treatments or preventive vaccines for COVID-19. The Texas State Board of Pharmacy (TSBP) has placed restrictions for prescriptions of chloroquine, hydroxychloroquine, azithromycin and another anti-malarial drug, mefloquine due to the shortages of these drugs. Shortages of these drugs have a negative effect on patients who need it. At this time, physicians are not allowed to prescribe these medications without a clinical diagnosis. Please refer to this official document from the TSBP for more information.

Due to the shortage of azithromycin, we will prescribe this medication exclusively to patients who can only take this medication due to drug allergies.

Office Hours for Partners in Health

Our office hours will remain the same. We have postponed all routine appointments and we are currently not accepting walk-ins. All illnesses are first evaluated with a virtual visit, which include but are not limited to: phone call, text, email, FaceTime or video chat. For other general consultations, please contact our office by phone at (512) 453-3542 or by email at info@partners-in-health.com. Please remember that Dr. Rhodes is available to our patients outside of our office hours by directly contacting her cell phone or email.

To stay up to date with the most recent guidelines from the CDC, please visit this website.

We thank you for your continued cooperation to help prevent the spread of COVID-19.

One Week into Social Distancing: Update on COVID-19

What is social distancing? 

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), social distancing means remaining out of congregate settings (crowded public places where close contact with others may occur, such as shopping centers, movie theaters, stadiums), avoiding mass gatherings, and maintaining distance (approximately 6 feet or 2 meters) from others when possible. These steps have been recommended in order to lessen one’s chances of catching COVID-19.

Other examples of social distancing that allows people to avoid larger crowds or crowded spaces include, but are not limited to:

  • Working from home instead of at the office
  • Closing schools or switching to online classes
  • Visiting loved ones by electronic devices instead of in person
  • Cancelling or postponing conferences and large meetings

Remember that social distancing is different from self-quarantine and isolation. People who have been exposed to COVID-19 and are at risk for coming down with it may practice self-quarantine. The CDC recommends that self-quarantine lasts 14 days. Self-quarantine involves washing your hands frequently and practicing standard hygiene, not sharing things like towels and utensils, staying at home, not having visitors, and staying at least 6 feet away from other people in your household. For people who are confirmed to have COVID-19 through testing, isolation is the recommendation. This means keeping people who are infected with a contagious illness away from those who are not infected. Isolation can take place at home, hospital, or a care facility. Special personal protective equipment (PPE) needs to be used to care for these patients in health care settings.

What is “flattening the curve?”

Coined by the CDC, this term refers to the implementation of protective practices to slow the rate of COVID-19 infection, in order to ensure that hospitals and health care facilities have enough room, supplies, and health care providers for all patients who need care. A large number of people becoming very sick over the course of a few days can potentially overwhelm a hospital or health care facility, as we have seen in other countries already. Too many people becoming severely ill with COVID-19 at the same time can result in a shortage of hospital beds, equipment, and providers.

On the contrary, if that same large number of people became sick at a slower rate, over the course of several weeks, the line on the graph would be a longer, flatter, curve. In this case, there is a better chance of the hospital being able to keep up with adequate supplies, beds, and health care providers to care for them.

At this time, our practice has decided to postpone appointments that are not urgent, including routine physicals. Other general consultations and illnesses will first be evaluated via a virtual visit, which includes, but is not limited to: phone call, text, FaceTime, or video chat. Our goal as a practice is to make sure our patients follow the practice of social distancing, and to stay at home as much as possible. This pandemic can be overwhelming, but every person can help slow down the spread of COVID-19. By doing your part, you can make a big difference to your health and the health of others around you.

 

A note to our patients regarding COVID-19

We are closely monitoring the Coronavirus (COVID-19) situation and following recommendations from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), World Health Organization, and the City of Austin.

At this time, we are postponing all events scheduled for this month until further notice. This includes the free skin check with Dr. Tyler Hollmig scheduled for March 25th and our “A Walk in the Park” event scheduled for March 29th.

At this time, all testing for patients who qualify are held at the public health labs. Please refer to this website: http://www.austintexas.gov/department/health for the Austin Public Health Department or call (512) 972-5555. If you are presenting with symptoms but are not able to get tested, please quarantine yourself for 14 days and until completely symptom-free.

In an effort to protect you, our medical team, and the general public, please do not go directly to your doctor’s office or the emergency department without calling first. A phone call will allow care teams to determine the best location for you to be evaluated. In some cases, phone calls may allow you to avoid an in-person evaluation, which helps minimize exposure to the public. If you are experiencing a medical emergency, such as severe shortness of breath, chest pain, or altered mental status, please call 911.
To keep yourself and others healthy:
  • Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds, especially after going to the bathroom; before eating; and after blowing your nose, coughing, or sneezing.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.
  • Stay home when you are sick.
  • Cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue or bent elbow (if tissue is unavailable), then throw the tissue in the trash.
  • Avoid all non-essential travel.
  • Know the symptoms: fever, cough, shortness of breath
If you have an existing routine appointment scheduled, and are experiencing respiratory symptoms such as fever, cough, or shortness of breath, please call the office prior to the appointment to discuss how your care will best be served.

This is a rapidly evolving situation, and one that we are actively monitoring. We are ready to adjust as things progress, and we will keep our patients up to date throughout.

Should you wear a mask? And other facts about COVID-19

What is coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19)?

CDC is responding to an outbreak of respiratory disease caused by a novel (new) coronavirus that was first detected in China and which has now been detected in almost 70 locations internationally, including in the United States. The virus has been named “SARS-CoV-2” and the disease it causes has been named “coronavirus disease 2019” (abbreviated “COVID-19”).

Only the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and other public health labs are authorized to provide testing for COVID-19 in the U.S. 

  • All tests have to be run by the CDC through your local health department. If you are experiencing the symptoms below, please refer to this website for the Austin Public Health Department: http://www.austintexas.gov/department/health or call 512-972-5555.

Ten things to do to avoid getting sick

  1. Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds, especially after going to the bathroom; before eating; and after blowing your nose, coughing, or sneezing
  2. Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands
  3. Stay home when you are sick
  4. Cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue or bent elbow (if tissue is unavailable), then throw the tissue in the trash
  5. Get your flu shot 
  6. Practice social distancing by keeping a 1-3 foot barrier between others when in conversation
  7. Quarantine yourself for 14 days if presenting with symptoms
  8. Avoid non-essential travel to the following countries: China, Italy, Iran, Japan and South Korea
  9. Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces especially your phone and steering wheel
  10. Only go to the hospital if you are exhibiting symptoms and are in need of immediate medical attention and testing (If unsure, call your doctor first.)

You can help stop the spread of COVID-19 by knowing the signs and symptoms:

  • Fever
  • Cough
  • Shortness of breath

Should you wear a mask?

If you are healthy and not working in healthcare, the answer is NO.

You can visit the CDC website for more information at cdc.gov

  • Click here for a Coronavirus fact sheet.
  • Click here to keep up to date with the current count in Texas.

Still time left to schedule your FREE Skin Check with Dr. Hollmig

I am happy to announce that I am partnering with Dr. Tyler Hollmig, who is one of the top dermatological specialists in Austin. Dr. Hollmig will be offering free skin checks to my concierge members as a special, added value service on Wednesday, March 25th at our office. When caught early, skin cancer is highly treatable. Routine Skin Cancer exams are extremely important in detecting abnormal skin lesions early. Our skin is constantly evolving as we age, and extrinsic factors such as the sun can have a detrimental effect on our skin. Studies show that early exposure to excessive sun at a young age can potentially cause skin cancer later in life. To protect your skin against the sun’s harmful rays, wear a broad-spectrum 30 SPF for higher sunscreen every day. Seek shade as often as possible and wear clothing that shields the sun’s rays as often as possible. 

Skin exams are recommended at a minimum of once a year, but with a personal for family history of skin cancer, skin checks are recommended more frequently. If you notice any suspicious spots on your skin or your partner’s skin, or anything that is changing, itching or bleeding, see a board-certified dermatologist.

Dr. Hollmig trained at Stanford University and is currently the Director of Dermatology Surgery and Laser and Cosmetic Dermatology for UT Dell Austin. He offers advanced, highly aesthetic and surgical reconstructions, along with Laser and Cosmetic Dermatology, including treatment of wrinkles, sun damage, red and brown spots, scars, unwanted skin lesions, birthmarks, unwanted hair, and other aesthetic therapies. 

To learn more, either give us a call at 512-453-3542 or email us at info@partners-in-health.com to schedule your skin check today! 

Wednesday, March 25th 5:30 – 8 PM

*Offer for current concierge members of Dr. Roxana Rhodes only*

A Walk in the Park – March 29th

Get to know your doctor while taking a walk in the park! Feel free to bring your loved ones, including your furry friends.

The CDC recommends at least 150 minutes of moderate exercise per week. While a goal of 10,000 steps is usually recommended, it may not be right for you. If you are new to exercise or returning from an injury, make sure to start slowly to avoid further injuries. Meeting your personal fitness goals can be as simple as an extra five-minute walk.

There are other health benefits of a 30-minute daily stroll to your mental health. Studies show it can help slow down mental decline, lower blood pressure, improve sleep and relieve depression.

Our staff will be assisting you in meeting your fitness goals through this relaxing walk through the park. We will also be providing healthy snacks and waters for attendees.

Please click here to RSVP!